Difference between revisions of "Animism"

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<blockquote>Animism in the narrower sense is the theory of psychic concepts, and in the wider sense, of spiritual beings in general. Animatism, the animation theory of seemingly inanimate nature, is a further subdivision which also includes animatism and animism. The name animism, formerly applied to a definite philosophic system, seems to have acquired its present meaning through E. B. Taylor.<ref>{{T&T}} Ch. 3</ref></blockquote>
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<blockquote>Animism in the narrower [[sense]] is the [[theory]] of [[psychic]] [[concepts]], and in the wider sense, of spiritual beings in general. [[Animatism]], the animation theory of seemingly inanimate [[nature]], is a further subdivision which also includes animatism and animism. The [[name]] animism, formerly applied to a definite philosophic [[system]], seems to have acquired its [[present]] [[meaning]] through E. B. Taylor.<ref>{{T&T}} Ch. 3</ref></blockquote>
  
 
{{Freudian Dictionary}}
 
{{Freudian Dictionary}}

Latest revision as of 20:48, 23 May 2019

Animism in the narrower sense is the theory of psychic concepts, and in the wider sense, of spiritual beings in general. Animatism, the animation theory of seemingly inanimate nature, is a further subdivision which also includes animatism and animism. The name animism, formerly applied to a definite philosophic system, seems to have acquired its present meaning through E. B. Taylor.[1]