Difference between revisions of "Class"

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Class
 
Class
Class, according to Marx, is similarly situated people who share the same wants and needs;  
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Class, according to [[Marx]], is similarly situated [[people]] who share the same wants and [[needs]];  
 
classes do not simply appear, they are slowly and often painstakingly formed.  Through a
 
classes do not simply appear, they are slowly and often painstakingly formed.  Through a
long and complex process of struggling together about issues of local and later national
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long and [[complex]] [[process]] of struggling together [[about]] issues of local and later national
interest to them, they gradually become a unity, a true class.  (Tong, Rosemarie.  Feminist
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interest to [[them]], they gradually become a [[unity]], a [[true]] class.  (Tong, Rosemarie.  [[Feminist]]
Thought:  A More Comprehensive Introduction, 1998, p. 97-98.)
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[[Thought]]:  A More Comprehensive Introduction, 1998, p. 97-98.)
  
Class in Marxist theory, is both race- and sex-blind.  (Chris Kramarae & Paula A. Treichler.  
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Class in [[Marxist]] [[theory]], is both [[race]]- and sex-blind.  (Chris Kramarae & Paula A. Treichler.  
 
Amazons, Bluestockings, and Crones, Pandora Press, 1992, p. 96.)
 
Amazons, Bluestockings, and Crones, Pandora Press, 1992, p. 96.)
  
Class "Is not defined by our relationship to the mode of production in the simple sense that
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Class "Is not defined by our [[relationship]] to the [[mode of production]] in the simple [[sense]] that
if we sell our labor power (for a day or a lifetime), or are part of the family of someone
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if we sell our labor [[power]] (for a day or a lifetime), or are part of the [[family]] of someone
(presumably male) who does, we are working-class.  Being working-class is a mode of life,
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(presumably [[male]]) who does, we are [[working]]-class.  [[Being]] working-class is a mode of [[life]],
a way of living life based on, but not exclusively defined by, the simple fact that we must
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a way of [[living]] life based on, but not exclusively defined by, the simple fact that we must
sell our labor power to stay alive.  Class distinctions in capitalist society are part of a
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sell our labor power to stay alive.  Class distinctions in [[capitalist]] [[society]] are part of a
totality, a mode of life structured as well by sexism and racism...."  (Chris Kramarae &
+
[[totality]], a mode of life [[structured]] as well by sexism and [[racism]]...."  (Chris Kramarae &
 
Paula A. Treichler.  Amazons, Bluestockings, and Crones, Pandora Press, 1992, p. 96.)
 
Paula A. Treichler.  Amazons, Bluestockings, and Crones, Pandora Press, 1992, p. 96.)
  
The structure of capitalism produces two opposing classes:  a ruling class whose members
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The [[structure]] of [[capitalism]] produces two opposing classes:  a [[ruling class]] whose members
own and control the means of production and a working class whose members, lacking
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own and [[control]] the means of production and a [[working class]] whose members, [[lacking]]
such ownership, sell their labor power to capital in order to survive.  (Abramovitz, Mimi.  
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such ownership, sell their labor power to [[capital]] in [[order]] to survive.  (Abramovitz, Mimi.  
Regulating the Lives of Women, 1989, p. 19.)  
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Regulating the Lives of [[Women]], 1989, p. 19.)  
  
 
[[Category:Marxism]]
 
[[Category:Marxism]]

Latest revision as of 00:04, 24 May 2019

Class Class, according to Marx, is similarly situated people who share the same wants and needs; classes do not simply appear, they are slowly and often painstakingly formed. Through a long and complex process of struggling together about issues of local and later national interest to them, they gradually become a unity, a true class. (Tong, Rosemarie. Feminist Thought: A More Comprehensive Introduction, 1998, p. 97-98.)

Class in Marxist theory, is both race- and sex-blind. (Chris Kramarae & Paula A. Treichler. Amazons, Bluestockings, and Crones, Pandora Press, 1992, p. 96.)

Class "Is not defined by our relationship to the mode of production in the simple sense that if we sell our labor power (for a day or a lifetime), or are part of the family of someone (presumably male) who does, we are working-class. Being working-class is a mode of life, a way of living life based on, but not exclusively defined by, the simple fact that we must sell our labor power to stay alive. Class distinctions in capitalist society are part of a totality, a mode of life structured as well by sexism and racism...." (Chris Kramarae & Paula A. Treichler. Amazons, Bluestockings, and Crones, Pandora Press, 1992, p. 96.)

The structure of capitalism produces two opposing classes: a ruling class whose members own and control the means of production and a working class whose members, lacking such ownership, sell their labor power to capital in order to survive. (Abramovitz, Mimi. Regulating the Lives of Women, 1989, p. 19.)