Difference between revisions of "Nostalgia"

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Nostalgia (Sehnsucht) refers to the moral pain of the expatriate when he is overcome with the obsession of return. The self-absorption, morosity, and feeling that there is nothing more to say about the situation are the first clinical manifestations of a secret torment that is likely to become aggravated. A state of desolation and physical malaise is soon established, which is fertile ground for infection and functional disorders, as if the subject's vitality had been sapped. In eighteenth- and nineteenth-century medical practice, this...
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Nostalgia (Sehnsucht) refers to the [[moral]] [[pain]] of the expatriate when he is overcome with the [[obsession]] of [[return]]. The [[self]]-absorption, morosity, and [[feeling]] that there is [[nothing]] more to say [[about]] the [[situation]] are the first [[clinical]] manifestations of a [[secret]] torment that is likely to become aggravated. A [[state]] of desolation and [[physical]] malaise is soon established, which is fertile ground for infection and functional disorders, as if the [[subject]]'s vitality had been sapped. In eighteenth- and nineteenth-century medical [[practice]], this...
  
  

Latest revision as of 06:20, 1 June 2019

Nostalgia (Sehnsucht) refers to the moral pain of the expatriate when he is overcome with the obsession of return. The self-absorption, morosity, and feeling that there is nothing more to say about the situation are the first clinical manifestations of a secret torment that is likely to become aggravated. A state of desolation and physical malaise is soon established, which is fertile ground for infection and functional disorders, as if the subject's vitality had been sapped. In eighteenth- and nineteenth-century medical practice, this...