Difference between revisions of "Pregenital"

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The term pregenital designates the libidinal phases prior to the definitive, genital organization of psychosexuality.
 
The term pregenital designates the libidinal phases prior to the definitive, genital organization of psychosexuality.
 
This adjective first appeared in Sigmund Freud's 1913 article, "The Disposition to Obsessional Neurosis: A Contribution to the Problem of Choice of Neurosis." The idea of a pregenital organization of the libido was introduced in the context of anal erotism. The qualifier "pregenital," which at this point in Freud's work generally defines the child's psychosexual organization, takes into consideration the play of the...
 
This adjective first appeared in Sigmund Freud's 1913 article, "The Disposition to Obsessional Neurosis: A Contribution to the Problem of Choice of Neurosis." The idea of a pregenital organization of the libido was introduced in the context of anal erotism. The qualifier "pregenital," which at this point in Freud's work generally defines the child's psychosexual organization, takes into consideration the play of the...
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126, 151, 211, 231, 273, 298,315,320<ref>Muller, John P. and William J. Richardson. Lacan and Language: A Reader's Guide to Ecrits. New York: International Universiites Press, Inc., 1982.</ref>
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==References==
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<references/>
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[[Category:Psychoanalysis]]
 
[[Category:Psychoanalysis]]

Revision as of 10:58, 30 May 2006

The term pregenital designates the libidinal phases prior to the definitive, genital organization of psychosexuality. This adjective first appeared in Sigmund Freud's 1913 article, "The Disposition to Obsessional Neurosis: A Contribution to the Problem of Choice of Neurosis." The idea of a pregenital organization of the libido was introduced in the context of anal erotism. The qualifier "pregenital," which at this point in Freud's work generally defines the child's psychosexual organization, takes into consideration the play of the...


126, 151, 211, 231, 273, 298,315,320[1]

References

  1. Muller, John P. and William J. Richardson. Lacan and Language: A Reader's Guide to Ecrits. New York: International Universiites Press, Inc., 1982.