Difference between revisions of "Self-punishment paranoia"

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#redirect [[paranoia]]
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=====The Case of Aimée=====
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The [[thesis]] contains a detailed analysis of a [[woman]], named [[Aimée]] after the heroine of one of her unpublished novels, who had attempted to stab a well-known [[Paris]]ian acctress, [[Huguette Duflos]].  The case was widely reported in the press at the time, and [[Lacan]] tried gradually to piece together the logic behind her apparently irrational [[act]].  His [[thesis]] introduced a new concept into the [[psychiatry|psychiatric milieu]], that of "[[self-punishment paranoia]]".  [[Lacan]] argued that, in striking the actress, [[Aimée]] was in fact striking herself: [[Duflos]] represented a [[woman]] with [[freedom]] and [[culture|social prestige]], exactly the sort of [[woman]] that [[Aimée]] aspired to become.
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==See Also==
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* [[Paranoia]]
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* [[Aimée]]
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[[Category:Treatment]]
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[[Category:Short]]

Revision as of 06:47, 15 November 2006

The Case of Aimée

The thesis contains a detailed analysis of a woman, named Aimée after the heroine of one of her unpublished novels, who had attempted to stab a well-known Parisian acctress, Huguette Duflos. The case was widely reported in the press at the time, and Lacan tried gradually to piece together the logic behind her apparently irrational act. His thesis introduced a new concept into the psychiatric milieu, that of "self-punishment paranoia". Lacan argued that, in striking the actress, Aimée was in fact striking herself: Duflos represented a woman with freedom and social prestige, exactly the sort of woman that Aimée aspired to become.

See Also