Difference between revisions of "Session"

From No Subject - Encyclopedia of Psychoanalysis
Jump to: navigation, search
Line 9: Line 9:
 
By contrast, he wanted to find for each session a stopping place suited to what the [[patient]] was [[speech|saying]].  He believed that nothing in theory warrants the fifty-minute session.  Rather, the adjustment of the length of the session should become one of the tools of [[psychoanalysis]].
 
By contrast, he wanted to find for each session a stopping place suited to what the [[patient]] was [[speech|saying]].  He believed that nothing in theory warrants the fifty-minute session.  Rather, the adjustment of the length of the session should become one of the tools of [[psychoanalysis]].
  
<!-- Lacan antagonized many people by putting the length of the psychoanalytic session into question.  The difference between the fifty-minute hour and the "short" session is a difference between -->
+
<!-- Lacan antagonized many people by putting the length of the psychoanalytic session into question.  The difference between the fifty-minute hour and the "short" session is a difference between two concepts of time.  On the one side, time is filled with precision; on the other, it is approximate and variable.  In the normal psychoanalytic hour it is the clock that decides the ending of the session. -->
 
+
<!-- Lacan argued that some analysands, knowing that they were guaranteed fifty minutes no matter what, used their sessions to discuss things that did not interest them in the least.  Lacan reasoned that such analysands were using the fifty-minute hour as a resistance, as an excuse to waste the [[analyst]]'s [[time]], to make him or her wait for them. <blockquote>"We know how the patient reckons the passage of time and adjusts his story to the clock, how he contrives to be saved by the clock.  We know how he anticipates the end of the hour ... keeping an eye on the clock as on a shelter looming in the distance."</blockquote> -->
 +
<!-- One argument in favor of the variable session is that it prevents boredom.  Many patients come to know when the [[analyst]] is going to end.  If the [[analyst]] cuts off quickly, sessions cannot become an empty ritual.  The [[analyst]] can thus use the element of surprise to open up new pathways.  Lacan's view was that if the patient could be dismissed in the middle of a sentence or a dream or an interval of silence it would provoke the [[patient]] to make a clear revelation of that s/he had been hesitant to disclose. -->
 
Alternatively, the [[analyst]] can also [[punctuate]] the [[analysand]]'s [[speech]] by a moment of [[silence]], or by interrupting the [[analysand]], or by terminating the [[session]] at an opportune moment.<ref>{{E}} p.44</ref>   
 
Alternatively, the [[analyst]] can also [[punctuate]] the [[analysand]]'s [[speech]] by a moment of [[silence]], or by interrupting the [[analysand]], or by terminating the [[session]] at an opportune moment.<ref>{{E}} p.44</ref>   
  

Revision as of 21:01, 7 November 2006

Sessions of Variable Duration

Lacan's practice of sessions of variable duration (French: séances scandées) came to be one of the main reasons that the IPA gave for excluding him when the SFP was negotiating for IPA recognition in the early 1960s. Alternatively, the analyst can also punctuate the analysand's speech by a moment of silence, or by interrupting the analysand, or by terminating the session at an opportune moment.[1]

This last form of punctuation has been a source of controversy throughout the history of Lacanian psychoanalysis, since it contravenes the traditional IPA practice of sessions of fixed duration.

Today, the technique of punctuation, especially as expressed in the practice of sessions of variable duration, continues to be a distinctive feature of Lacanian psychoanalysis.

See Also

References

  1. Lacan, Jacques. Écrits: A Selection. Trans. Alan Sheridan. London: Tavistock Publications, 1977. p.44