Difference between revisions of "Talk:Signifying chain"

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The term '[[signifying chain]]' ([[French]]:''[[chaîne signifiante]]'', ''[[chaîne du signifiant]]'') is introduced by [[Jacques Lacan]] in 1957 to describe a network of [[signifiers]] (which are linked together) which constitute the [[symbolic]] [[order]].
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The [[signifying chain]] is compared to "rings of a necklace that is a ring in another necklace made of rings."<ref>{{E}} p.153</ref>
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==Meaning==
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A [[signifying chain]] is [[metonymy|metonymic]] in the production of [[meaning]].
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A [[signifying chain]] is never complete, because it is always possible to add another [[signifier]] to it, ''ad infinitum''.
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[[Signification]] is not present at any one point in the [[chain]], but rather [[meaning]] 'insists' in the movement from one [[signifier]] to another.<ref>{{E}} p.153</ref>
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==The subject==
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The [[subject]] is inscribed in a [[signifying chain]] before its [[birth]] and after its [[death]].<ref>{{Ec}} p.468</ref>
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==Miscellaneous==
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The [[signifying chain]] is the stream of [[speech]], in which [[signifier]]s are combined in accordance with the [[law]]s of grammar.
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The [[signifying chain]], in its [[diachronic]] dimension is [[syntagmatic]] and [[metonymic]], in its [[synchronic]] dimension, it is associative and [[metaphor]]ic.
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The [[signifying chain]] is inscribed in the [[symbolic]] [[order]].
 
The [[signifying chain]] is inscribed in the [[symbolic]] [[order]].

Revision as of 23:02, 17 August 2006

The term 'signifying chain' (French:chaîne signifiante, chaîne du signifiant) is introduced by Jacques Lacan in 1957 to describe a network of signifiers (which are linked together) which constitute the symbolic order.

The signifying chain is compared to "rings of a necklace that is a ring in another necklace made of rings."[1]

Meaning

A signifying chain is metonymic in the production of meaning.

A signifying chain is never complete, because it is always possible to add another signifier to it, ad infinitum.

Signification is not present at any one point in the chain, but rather meaning 'insists' in the movement from one signifier to another.[2]

The subject

The subject is inscribed in a signifying chain before its birth and after its death.[3]

Miscellaneous

The signifying chain is the stream of speech, in which signifiers are combined in accordance with the laws of grammar.

The signifying chain, in its diachronic dimension is syntagmatic and metonymic, in its synchronic dimension, it is associative and metaphoric.



The signifying chain is inscribed in the symbolic order.


constitutes the symbolic world of the subject.

  1. Lacan, Jacques. Écrits: A Selection. Trans. Alan Sheridan. London: Tavistock Publications, 1977. p.153
  2. Lacan, Jacques. Écrits: A Selection. Trans. Alan Sheridan. London: Tavistock Publications, 1977. p.153
  3. Lacan, Jacques. Écrits. Paris: Seuil, 1966. p.468