École Freudienne de Paris

From No Subject - Encyclopedia of Psychoanalysis

The École Freudienne de Paris (EFP) was a French psychoanalytic school founded by Jacques Lacan on 12 June 1964,

following the unsuccessful attempt by the Société Française de Psychanalyse (SFP) to affiliate to the International Psychoanalytical Association (IPA) .

The SFP divided into those willing to recognize the condition laid down by the IPA -- the exclusion of Lacan from the training program, and those who regrouped around Lacan.


after years of dispute with the International Psychoanalytical Association over the (analytic practice) methods he used in his training analyses.


Background

Lacan had been a member of the Société Parisienne de Psychanalyse (SPP), which was a member body of the International Psychoanalytical Association (IPA).

In 1953, after a disagreement about analytic practice methods, Lacan and many of his colleagues left the SPP to form a new group the Société Française de Psychanalyse ([[SFP)(French School of Psychoanalysis).

One of the consequences of this move was to deprive the new group of membership within the IPA.

In the following years a complex process of negotiation was to take place to determine the status of the SFP within the IPA.

Lacan’s practice, with his controversial innovation of variable-length sessions, and the critical stance he took towards much of the accepted orthodoxy of psychoanalytic theory and practice led, in 1963, to a condition being set by the IPA that the registration of the SFP was dependent upon Lacan being removed from the list of training analysts with the organisation.

Lacan refused such a condition and left the SFP to form his own school which became know as the École Freudienne de Paris (EFP).

History of the EFP

In 1969, a group disputing the EFP's accreditation process broke away to form the Organisation psychanalytique de langue française, also known as the "Quatrième Groupe" (the Fourth Group).

In January 1980 Lacan announced the dissolution of the EFP.


The EPP was unilaterally dissolved by Lacan in 1980.

See Also